Integrating is easier than ever before.

Senate Bill 679 allows Texas Doctors of Chiropractic to form business entities with physicians and podiatrists. This groundbreaking bill was signed into law by Governor Greg Abbott on June 1, 2017 and eliminates legal and logistical hurdles that previously discouraged Texas DC’s from providing collaborative care to patients.

We can help you medically integrate your chiropractic practice using one single business entity that you manage and control. And the company can be structured to allow you to keep up to 100% of retained earnings and the proceeds of an eventual clinic sale. We can also convert older “dual entity” practices into new, streamlined “single-entity” practices that provide these advantages.

Experienced counsel. Reliable advice.

Successful integration requires a corporate structure that complies with state and federal law and the many rules promulgated by the Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners, the Texas Medical Board and other state agencies. We can ensure strict compliance with these guidelines and maximize your operational and financial control over your practice.

→ Joshua Massingill is an attorney and lobbyist for the Texas Chiropractic Association. He assisted in drafting SB 679 and helped guide the bill to passage.

→ Larry Laurent has practiced chiropractic law in Texas for over 25 years. He is highly experienced in helping DC’s navigate complex legal issues and has helped more than 100 Texas DC’s integrate their professional practices.

Interested in learning more? Schedule a free consultation today.

Maintain Control Over the Business You've Built

Integrate with a physician-owner while maintaining control over the company you’ve worked hard to build. Stay in the driver’s seat.

Fine-Tune Your Practice

Provide broad medical services to the public in a fully-integrated environment or simply add a few services to your clinic’s offerings. The choice is yours.

Keep 100% of Retained Earnings and Clinic Sale Proceeds

Integrated practices may be customized to suit a variety of business arrangements, including those in which a DC-owner keeps up to 100% of retained earnings.

Provide Better Care to Patients

Promote health and wellness by offering select medical services to the public. Employ specialists to meet your patients’ medical needs.

Expand the Scope of Services Your Company Offers

Medical integration does not expand the scope of services a chiropractor may perform, but does expand the services your company may offer to patients.

Maximize Profitability

Diversifying your clinic’s offerings may create new revenue streams and increase patient satisfaction. This may translate into increased profit.

New Medical Integration

$5,000

  • Filing of Documents with Secretary of State
  • Certificate of Formation (Articles of Organization)
  • Company Operating Agreement
  • Shareholder Agreement
  • HIPAA Business Associate Agreement
  • Employment Agreement for Medical Director
  • Employment Agreements for Physicians
  • Employment Agreements for Physician Assistants
  • Employment Agreements for Nurse Practitioners
  • Employment Agreements for Doctors of Chiropractic
  • Employment Agreements for Physical Therapists
  • Assumed Business Name (if required)
  • Banking Resolution
  • Legal Handbook for Integrated Practices

Get Started

Dual-Entity to Single-Entity Conversion

$4,000

  • Revised Company Operating Agreement
  • Ownership Interest Purchase Agreement
  • Bill of Sale and Assignment
  • Shareholder Agreement
  • HIPAA Business Associate Agreement
  • Employment Agreement for Medical Director
  • Employment Agreements for Physicians
  • Employment Agreements for Physician Assistants
  • Employment Agreements for Nurse Practitioners
  • Employment Agreements for Doctors of Chiropractic
  • Employment Agreements for Physical Therapists
  • Assumed Business Name (if required)
  • Banking Resolution
  • Legal Handbook for Integrated Practices

Get Started

Frequently Asked Questions

Will medical integration expand my scope of practice?

No. Chiropractic scope of practice is strictly defined in statute and enforced by the Texas Board of Chiropractic Examiners. No business arrangement can circumvent these provisions. However, Texas law does allow chiropractors to jointly own and operate a medical practice with physicians and podiatrists so long as each practitioner only performs services that are within their respective scopes of practice. This means that medical integration does not expand the scope of services a chiropractor may lawfully perform, but does expand the scope of services a jointly-owned medical entity may offer to the public.

Is medical integration really neccesary?

Absolutely not! Many chiropractors practice successfully in traditional settings. However, doctors wishing to expand the types of services offered to their patients may want to consider medial integration. This approach is definitely preferable to paying a non-governmental third party for a meaningless “certification” that will allegedly enhance a chiropractor’s scope of practice. There are no shortcuts to medical integration. If the DC-business owner wants to offer medical services to patients, a jointly-owned entity that strictly complies with Texas’ rigorous scope of practice laws is the only answer.

Is medical integration complicated?

Yes…and no. From a legal standpoint, organizing a jointly-owned medical entity that complies with Texas law is relatively complex. Each situation is different, of course, but the overall complexity far exceeds that of a typical business formation. From the client’s point of view, the process is simple. We counsel clients to ensure a full understanding of the law’s requirements and provide clients with a Best Practices Guide that explains each legal document and its provisions.

From a business standpoint, medical integration can be quite complex. The level of difficulty is determined by a number of factors, including the number and type of medical services to be offered, the number and type of employees, whether the practice intends to accept insurance or other types of third-party payment (such as Medicare and Medicaid), and whether the owner has engaged with a consulting firm experienced in medical integration.

We happily counsel clients on the legal ramifications of medical integration, but do not offer guidance regarding financial matters or whether medical integration makes good business sense.